Bookish Discussions

Autumn TBR

Hi friends!

It’s finally starting to feel like Autumn and I’m so ready. The crisp mornings, the darkening days, the smell of spiced apple and cosy reading corners.

What better way to celebrate the new season by setting myself an Autumn reading list? The books I’ve chosen fit with the dark and cosy aesthetics of Autumn. From non-fiction to modern classics, witchy reads to sadism, I’ve got the lot. Let’s take a closer look at my Autumn picks:


THE MARQUIS DE SADE’S JUSTINE

This is the oldest book on my TBR and probably the darkest.EDE93769-21D1-4E3F-B56F-C8A855026CB6-1DEC5EE0-8B94-435B-986A-BCEC5641ED7B

Orphaned and penniless at 12, the beautiful and devout Justine embarks upon her remarkable odyssey. Her steadfast faith and naive trust in everyone she meets destine her from the outset for sexual exploitation and martyrdom.

If you didn’t know, or couldn’t guess, this is where the word “sadism” comes from. The Marquis de Sade has a very… unusual style of writing, examining the tattoo corners of civilisation. I recently read another French translated classic early this year, The Nun by Denis Diderot, which was disturbing but an interesting read. I hope this one is, too. Understandably, it’s going to be an uncomfortable experience, but I’ve heard great things about this one.


ALLEN RAINE’S A WELSH WITCH

I recently came across Honno Classics, a small publishing house that has a series dedicated to Welsh Women’s Classics. I visited their website out of curiosity. As soon as I saw A Welsh Witch, I knew I had to buy a few.

I’m a sucker for witchy books.

This one just misses the mark for a Victorian classic, being published in 1902, but it’s still fresh from the period. I assume it has a lot of tropes and characteristics of this time. I’ve never read about a Welsh witch before – an English and a Scottish one, yes, but not a Welsh one. It has a long-winded blurb, but here is a lovely little summary that tells you anything but the plot:

A Welsh Witch parallels a superstitious fishing village and an early industrial community with its harsh working conditions, and explores the ways in which human resilience and empathy can make a “romance of rough places.”

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Bookish Discussions

Bookish Favourites | Summer 2019:

2019 hasn’t been the best year for reading, so I have very little favourites when it comes to specific books. Nevertheless, that’s never stopped me. I’ve fallen in love with lots of bookish things recently, and I kindaaaa wanted to talk about them with you today, so let’s get into it!


ED24CDD8-F05D-4AF2-8AED-2FEE8842AC7ANEO-VICTORIAN MURDER MYSTERIES:

Spending all day studying Victorian literature was fun in the beginning. Now, I dread it. I can’t pick up a Victorian classic without over-analysing it, or finding myself frustrated and a little bored. I haven’t fallen out of love with them, no, never, but I need a little break from them. So, I’ve substituted Victorian classics for neo-Victorian books. More specifically, murder mysteries.

I can’t get enough of them.

It started with Ambrose Perry’s The Way of All Flesh. It was *such* a GOOD book, following a doctor and a maid who team up to solve the mysterious murders of working-class women in Victorian Edinburgh. Ever since then, I’ve added His Bloody Project, The Wages of Sin and The Murder of Harriet Monckton to my shelves, with more sitting in my wish list. I can’t be stopped. I won’t be stopped. I need my Victorian fix.

Continue reading “Bookish Favourites | Summer 2019:”