Bookish Discussions

New Grub Street: A Book About Books

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“Literature nowadays is a trade. […] He thinks first and foremost of the markets; when one kind of goods begins to go off slackly, he is ready with something new and appetizing. He knows perfectly all the possible sources of income.”

Rating: 4 stars

Read: 19 January – 31 January, 2019


George Gissing has quickly became a new interest of mine. New Grub Street was something else entirely – so unlike any other Victorian novel I’ve ever read. It was a very entertaining book about writing and getting published in the late Victorian society. As the Penguin Classics edition suggests,

New Grub Street is a social document and a story that draws us irresistibly into the twilit world of Edwin Reardon, a struggling novelist, and his friends and acquaintances in Grub Street including Jasper Milvain, an ambitious journalist, and Alfred Yule, an embittered critic. Gissing brings to life the bitter battles between integrity and the dictates of the market place, the miseries of genteel poverty and the damage that failure and hardship do to human personality and relationships.

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Bookish Discussions

January Reading Wrap-up:

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…so, January didn’t last that long, did it? I mean, most of my month was taken up with writing, editing and submitting my essays. Nevertheless, I did manage to read ten books, which is quite a shocker. Many are short, many are plays, but a few of them are quite chunky books, so I think it’s been a decent reading month.

As usual, I will have a review for *most* of the following. Those already published will be linked (in green or blue, depending on where you’re reading this), and the rest will follow next month. Let’s get into it…


A Court of Frost and Starlight by Sarah J. Maas | 3.5 stars:

Book 3.1 in the A Court of Thorns and Roses series. I think Maas’s intention was to provide full closure to Rhys and Feyre’s story. It was completely unnecessary, let me tell you, but it was also a fun and light read.

I always find myself drawn into Maas’s writing – her books are always so entertaining to read. I know she’s pretty problematic – and continues to be so – but I like to get lost in the complex and compelling worlds she creates. I love Feyre and Rhys, so I liked having this closure. It had zero plot, though, for those of you who like plot-based books!

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